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20121202
20121210
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 12
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> looking to the new year, the business environment, consumer sentiment, how are things shaping up for ford? >> well, right now it looks like it's going to continue to expand. both in gdp and the industry. based especially on the second half of this year. but again, it is all going to be very dependent on what the economy does and what we do especially in the united states to create an environment where the consumer feels confident and they can purchase these decisions opinions what about europe kux turn those losses into profits. >> we have announced our plan for europe which is similar to what we did in the united states. we will bring more vehicles in to people wanting value and restructuring the operations to get back to profitability but a very, very tough situation in europe economically. >> susie: you said will you step down as c.e.o. in 2014. what do you want to accomplish before you hand over the keys of ford. >> i want to complete the development of this family of vehicles, both for ford and lincoln that are absolutely best in class. and that people really love them and they reall
on the table could you imagine that breaking through the current political environment. >> i think basically now, gwen, there are three sticking points. one is the amount of revenue and the sources of revenue. the second is the amount of spending cuts and how much of that will come from the entitlement programs particularly health. the last sticking point is what do we do about this debt limit that we've come up against all the time that puts our credit in danger. >> ifill: the president has said the debt limit should be, at least in his opening statement, that the debt limit debate should be set aside and that nothing can be done unless the taxes are cut... are raised for the wealthy. is that part of a solution that you can see working for what it is everybody is trying to get to here? >> look, gwen, i'm not a bit worried that it appears on the surface that secretary geithner ton the speaker didn't make any progress last week. that's just a theater you go through. geithner made his first offer. the republicans rejected it. no surprise. i'm sure that this offer that the speaker has made toda
's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and that mold has been called into question, not least by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think
and that -- those caring environments. but i think what this study is doing is it's really looking at what the reality is. the causes are a problem. poverty, trauma. fixing those is difficult. you have to lower crime, right? you have to get people jobs so that they get out of poverty. but what this report is looking at very specifically is a small subset of our society. young men and boys of color. specifically. and what they -- what their circumstances are, what their status is, and what it is that the legislature, communities, schools, our health system need to do to address the issues that these men and boys are facing. >> because when they suffer, it really affects all of us in terms of long-term productivity, the kinds of state services they need. local services. and we all fund that as taxpayers. i think we all have a stake. did the study talk about any possible solutions? are there any models that they cite as good examples of programs for young people? >> they cited programs across the state. many of them actually in the bay area and specifically in oakland where oakland is already
and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec task forces, elected state officials and corporate representatives close the doors to press and public, and together approve the bills that will be sent out to america. but americans have no idea they come from alec, unless someone like a mark pocan exposes it. >> when i went down to new orleans, to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states. and there was a proposal to provide special-needs scholarships. and lo and behold all of a sudden i come back to wisconsin, and what gets introduced? get ready. i know you're going to have a shocked look on your face. a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in the wisconsin legislature sponsored that special-needs bill, but the real sponsor was alec. pocan knew because the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. but pocan isn't only concerned that alec sneaks bills into the state legislature. the intent behind the bills troubles him too. >> some of their legislation sound
, they face a radically changed social media environment where youtube videos spread virally across the internet. >> a regular flu shot gone horribly wrong. >> these people were much more likely to believe something they had seen on youtube than the centers for disease control and the fda. that's a little frightening. >> tonight, frontline reports on the science and politics of the bitter "vaccine war." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.and by the corporatir public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. with grants from scott nathan and laura debonis, and the hagler family. >> what a cute little face. aww, here we come. it's a girl! >> yeah! >>
reduction or medicare and medicaid and social security or the environment, global climate change, it all comes back to how we receive information. and that this issue you're addressing in this letter is at the heart of your -- >> bill, many of the viewers there are concerned about the growing gap, unequal distribution of wealth and income. they're concerned about health care, concerned about global warming, concerned about women's rights, health, and many, many other issues. if you are concerned about those issues, you must be concerned about media and the increased concentration of ownership in the media. because unless we get ordinary people involved in that discussion. unless we make media relevant to the lives of ordinary people and not use it as a distraction, we are not going to resolve many of these serious crisis, global warming being one. there are scientists who will come on your show and say, "hey, forget everything else. if we don't get a handle on global warming, there's not going to be much less of this planet in a hundred years." do you see that often being portrayed in th
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)